The PulStar Blog

Thirty Three-Year Throwback

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Take a peek inside our winter newsletter from 1987.

Ah, 1987. At any given time, U2’s With or Without You was probably playing on millions of radios around the world. President Reagan was imploring Mikhail Gorbachev to “tear down this wall.” The Simpsons’ first episode aired.

And a predecessor of the PulStar was making waves at the Las Vegas Meeting of the ACA/ICA.

Back then, we were called Kinetic Technology. Multiple Impulse Therapy (MIT) was a relatively new form of chiropractic treatment and our founder, Dr. Joseph Evans, had already made it his business to advance the field. So that year, he took our new MIT device, the Model -115 Precision Adjustor, to Las Vegas to see how it would be received by the chiropractic community.

You can see how it went in our first ever newsletter. In it, you can read about the device’s rudimentary adjust functionality and listen to us boast about the fact that our device is computerized (all a bit funny now, considering the complexity of analysis capabilities and software in modern PulStar systems).

One doctor even says, “Using the new Precision Spinal Adjustor in my office has been the biggest boom to my practice in the past 10 years,” which is not unlike the comments we still receive about the PulStar today.

Two years after this was published, we became incorporated as Sense Technolgy, and in 1993, the first PulStar computerized analysis & multiple impulse adjusting technology system was developed.

But for now, let’s just enjoy this throwback to simpler times and simpler PulStars. Check out the newsletter below.

Our first The Shape of Things to Come newsletter.

We’ve been defining MIT since before the first PulStar was even released. Get our comprehensive guide in this quick 15-minute read.

*About the Header Photo- The original photo caption in the original The Shape of Things to Come newsletter read: Dr. John L. Stump, (left), Director, Gulfcoast Sports Medicine Center, Daphne, Ala., talks to Dr. Joseph M. Evans, Chief Executive Officer, Kinetic Technology, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA, about its new Precision Spinal Adjustor. It is a computerized instrument which gives the same thrust each time. Dr. Stump will use one instrument in the 1988 Olympic Study in Korea and another at his office in Alabama. Studies and research will be conducted on athletes and results will be published in The shape of things to come.

Christian Evans

Christian Evans

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